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A visual snapshot of the krama wheel cycle

giving scarves seamstresses sustainability uniforms updates from Cambodia wander well weavers

Our whirlwind journey in Cambodia may be coming to an end, but we experienced so many sights, felt so many emotions, and met with so many wonderful friends, new and old, that the week-long visit felt so much longer.

For those of you who followed along with the #wanderwell hashtag on Instagram and Facebook, we hope you enjoyed being a part of each day. For everyone else, below is a photo and video recap of our journey, which included visiting our weavers and seamstresses, and delivering new school uniforms to children in 5 villages. I hope this will give you an even better sense of just how many lives you impact through your krama wheel scarf purchases.  

This visit was such a reinvigorating reminder of why we do what we do. I am in awe of the weavers, seamstresses and children we support--they are so driven to improve their lives and it is an honor to invest in each of them through our work.

wander well,

Roni

 

A glimpse at the first step in our scarf production process: dyeing the cotton! This entire process takes hours, followed by a day of drying in the sun before the thread is ready for the loom.

 

Meet Meng, one of several weavers who welcomed us into her home to watch her at work.

 

Sietah works her magic on a scarf. These women have incredible focus, work ethic, and hand-foot coordination.

 

Scarf knotting circle

 

It takes about 2 hours to knot the fringe of each scarf. Sok and the other ladies joked how silky smooth their calves are from this technique.
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 For the final touch, our scarves go to a workshop staffed by disabled artisans where the krama wheel labels are hand-sewn and each scarf is inspected from end to end.

 

We learned of yet another way the krama is used in Cambodia: for storing flattened rice! It's pounded, sifted, then bundled up and ready to eat.

 

Roni with our talented crew of school uniform seamstresses...and a special little guest.

 


Just a snippet from the school uniform sewing process. Each krama wheel scarf not only supports a weaver and a child, but also the seamstress behind the uniform.

 

Amazing lunch served by our head school uniform seamstress Noeun

  

 Breaking in their new school uniforms in Trapiang Popel

 

The pride that the children exude in the uniforms tailored just for them is immeasurable.

 

Kids in Spien Thmey proudly wearing their new school uniforms

 

 Do you have a Paje scarf? Say hello to its namesake, whom we managed to catch in a moment of rest from his tire swing.



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  • Khan Nuruzzaman on

    Just WOW!!! Feeling lucky to have found it…!!!

    Cambodia!!! Wish I could travel there too… In our country, we call it “Taat”… I still have few videos I got in my cellphone (I believe)…

    But this documentary was AWESOME!!!

  • Elena on

    My goodness this is amazing!! It’s so awesome to see the step by step process and the children are adorable!! Great work Roni!!

  • Jenny on

    WOW! These photos are so cool and inspiring, brings tears to my eyes! Very honorable work! :D

  • Yann Beaullan thong on

    Continue the great work! Please let me know if I can be of any help.


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